Tag Archives: TRID

TRID – A Year Later

On October 3rd 2015, history was made in the mortgage industry when the TRID Rule, or the “Know Before You Owe” Rule was implemented in the United States. TRID was created in order to bridge the gap of transparency between borrowers, regulators, and lenders through more consumer-friendly documents and additional time restraints in the lending process with the hope of creating a more informed, and therefore better protected consumer. In the two years leading up to the implementation of TRID, those in the lending industry feared that additional paperwork and time would deter potential buyers. Once TRID was implemented, there were a few hiccups in the road, but the mortgage industry has been changed forever.

With a year of the implementation of TRID officially under America’s belt, we want to take a look back on the up’s, down’s, and still-to-come’s.

THE TRID TRAIN, A TIMELINE:

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November 2013: TRID unveiled to the lending industry with the proposed roll-out date to take place August 1st 2015. Cue industry-wide panic attacks due to the copious amounts of work they will have to do in order to adhere to the new rule (think technology and work process overhauls).

November 2013- June 2015: Everyone freaks out about the implementation of TRID, concurrent with an “administrative error” prompting the CFPB to change the start date to October 1st, 2015.

June 24th 2015-  A proposed amendment to TRID is released where the official start date of the “Know Before You Owe” rule will be October 3, 2015.

October 3, 2015- TRID goes into effect, and companies are mandated to comply. Many express concern and complaints that the CFPB is vague in some sections of TRID and the lack of guidance offered in the following months.

January 2016- Ellie Mae’s Origination Insight Report shows that total time to close has reached a high of 51 days, an indicator that the 6 days added in the process were being added to the total time instead of integrated in. Lending companies continue to complain about vagueness and lack of education from the CFPB regarding TRID.

July, 2016- The CFPB responds to concerns by lending companies and other businesses impacted by TRID and put some new changes into place regarding the secondary market to better help and inform lenders. The proposed changes include: tolerances for the total of payments, expanding the number of housing assistance loans that would qualify for exemptions, including cooperatives in the rule, and clarifying how a creditor could provide separate disclosure forms to the consumer and the seller.

August 2016- NAR surveyed 2,500 REALTORS to get their perspective of how the TRID rule was working which revealed that the majority saw no changes through the implementation of the rule.

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TRID IN 2017

While there were a few up’s, down’s, and hiccups in the past year for the lending industry (as expected with any major industry overhaul), it is apparent that TRID has been a mostly beneficial and much needed industry update for the consumer. As Pete Mills from the Mortgage Bankers Association stated, “TRID was a massive undertaking from a systems and business processes standpoint,” Although many anticipated the rule would significantly disrupt the closing process for consumers, the impact of TRID on consumers was mitigated because lenders and other participants in the closing process dutifully prepared for the final rule.”

Many lending companies are still making adjustments in their strategy with the implementation of the new rules, but with a year of adhering to TRID under their belt, lending companies are now analyzing ways to better streamline processes and resources to better serve their clients and integrate the additional 6 days in the process instead of adding them. Ready to own the house of your dreams? We’re here to help you from the beginning steps of your planning period all the way until you step through the doors of your new home. Contact us today at Alpha Mortgage!

 

“Know Before You Owe” – The Impacts of TRID on the HomeBuying Process

In our last blog , we described how The “Know before you Owe” mortgage initiative will promote the transparency of information associated with mortgage and lending procedures – thus helping borrowers better understand and prepare for their home financing decisions. TRID also referred to as the “TILA-RESPA” rule  (an acronym formed by combining the Truth in Lending Act or “TILA” and the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act or “Respa”) aims to simplify the disclosure and loan-closing process for consumers and better prepare buyers for their mortgage transaction.

We’ve compiled a review of how TRID Impacts lenders and borrowers below – Enjoy!

1. New Loan Disclosure Forms & Closing Disclosure Forms

Lenders must now provide borrowers with new disclosure forms that explain the loan estimate and loan closing process in more detail. This new Loan Disclosure form combines the Good Faith Estimate Form and the Truth in Lending Disclosure form have been combined into a new, simpler Loan Estimate form.

TRID also mandates that mortgage firms can not charge credit report check fees until the borrower has received the loan estimate form and has indicated intent to proceed with said firm. These new regulations should make it easier for consumers to shop for and understand the interest rates associated with different loan packages from different firms. 

TRID also gives rise to a new Closing Disclosure form that combines the final Truth-In-Lending statement and the HUD-1 settlement statement while providing details on the entire real estate transaction – including loan term, fees, and closing service costs.  

The accuracy and delivery of the new forms will be critical to ensuring the mortgage process is not derailed or delayed, and that borrowers have a smooth home purchase process.

2. Lenders must now provide Borrowers with the Loan Estimate & Closing Disclosure Forms in 3 Days

Three business days after the consumer provides a lender with their name, income, Social Security number, property address, property value estimate and mortgage loan amount sought, the send that consumer his/her Loan Estimate & Closing Disclosure Forms.

3. Longer Approval & Closing Times

In order to comply with the regulations imposed by TRID, lenders will be extra careful while both evaluating clients & filling out necessary paperwork – thus translating to longer approval & closing times and pretty much eliminating the the possibility of closing ahead of schedule.

 

Unfortunately, this extended loan closing timeline resulting from TRID will impact the home buyer’s move-in logistics and timeframe. Nevertheless, the increased transparency regulations will undoubtedly help more home buyers understand their loan options.

 

 

TRID For The Borrower- What It Means

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There are officially t-minus two days until ‘TRID Day’, and whether you are a potential borrower or an existing lender, there are no reasons to panic. On October 3rd, 2015, the TRID (also known as the ‘Know Before You Owe Rule’) Rule  will be implemented by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) as a way to better inform and protect borrowers during the lending process. TRID (short for TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure) is the merging of the Truth In Lending Act and Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act that aims to make the mortgage process more streamlined and highly functioning for regulators, borrowers, and lenders. Its goal is to create a more informed and therefore better protected consumer through regulated time constraints and clear, comprehensible documents for the consumer-which is why the act has attained the nickname ‘Know Before You Owe’.

The change comes in a time where transparency in every industry is essential for consumer trust and transaction, and when the Real Estate Industry has a need to shift priorities from stimulating the economy towards borrower comprehension in the lending process (seeing as it is one, if not THE biggest financial decisions they will make in their lives). The idea is that more time and more consumer-friendly documents will create breeding grounds for an all around more informed borrower.

So what specifically is changing under the TILA Act, you ask? Not too much. Here are the biggest two changes in the process:

1) Loan Estimate– As Rayce Robinson explains, what was originally the Good Faith Estimate has now changed to become the “Loan Estimate” or LE. The LE is created at the beginning of the lending process following the application submission of the borrower to their preferred lender and provides potential borrowers with a clear and accurate disclosure of any estimated fees during the lending process. The LE breaks things down for the buyer as well as makes it easier for buyers to compare estimates between firms.

2) Closing Disclosure– The Closing Disclosure, or CD, replaces the HUD-1. The CD is a detailed and accurate disclosure of every fee needed to close. The main difference with the CD is that lenders are required to provide borrowers with the document 3 days prior to closing to give them adequate time to compare the document to the LE as well as ask any questions they may have. Since last minute changes tend to occur when buying a home, after the borrower signs off on the CD, the lender need not add additional 3 days for changes unless they fall under three exceptions. 1) The last minute change caused APR to become inaccurate, 2) Borrower wants to change loan program, or 3) a pre-payment penalty was added to the loan.

The idea is to integrate the 3 days, not add them- something that will require planning, focus, and organization from all parties involved in the lending process.

TRID is going to be a refreshing change for the consumer in the Mortgage industry, and the biggest takeaway a potential borrower can get from the change is that there will be more transparency in a more simplistic fashion. It is important to find a lender who is trained, has tested, and integrated TRID methods into their practice- and at Alpha Mortgage, our loan officers are trained, tested, integrated and PREPARED to provide you with the best experience possible. Contact us today!

*Note: If you are looking to secure Home Equity Lines of Credit (HELOCs), a reverse mortgage, or a mortgage secured by a mobile home or dwelling not attached to real property, it is important to recognize that TRID won’t apply to you. *